British Values

Background and Aims

In the diverse, multicultural world we live in, we want to encourage our learners, all of whom are growing up British, to better understand the society they live in and their place within it.

In 2014, the Coalition Government issued guidance on what it called “fundamental British values”, defined as ‘democracy, the rule of law, individual liberty, and mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs’ as well as an understanding of British history heritage and traditions. At Fell Dyke Community Primary School we believe that all these ideas are important and valuable, not just in Britain but for many people all around the world. This document outlines the various ways in which we maintain and uphold them.

 

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At Fell Dyke we recognise the importance of learners gaining an understanding of how decisions are made at a local and national level. Throughout our curriculum we encourage debating and discussion of important issues. We have a School Council, elected by the children in the school and entrusted with decision-making powers. This ensures children can see the connection between the vote they cast and the way in which it shapes their environment.

Fell Dyke Community Primary School has a clear and consistent behaviour policy based on a set of school rules. The “going for gold” system in classes and three-stage system for escalation of more serious incidents reinforce these rules. Teachers work with their classes at the beginning of the school year to support their children to take ownership of the rules and, by extension, their own behaviour.

Legal issues surrounding substance abuse including illegal drugs as well as knife crime, anti social behaviour and sexual relationships are discussed in Year 6 to prepare learners for the more sophisticated and potentially more intimidating environment they will face at secondary school.

As a Rights Respecting School we recognise and promote individual rights and responsibilities.

Throughout the school children are encouraged to take the lead in their learning, to make choices about it and to make judgements about the appropriate level of challenge they require in different lessons.

Our behaviour policy promotes a culture in which learners take ownership of their own behaviour and choices, suggesting their own compromises and resolutions to potential conflicts.

Children are encouraged to know, understand and exercise their rights and personal freedoms safely – for example, through our E-Safety lessons in computing and in PSHE lessons. Stereotypes are challenged through our assembly themes and classroom discussions and we actively promote anti bullying campaigns and initiatives to raise understanding and awareness amongst our whole school community.

Many tasks within lessons are tackled by children working collaboratively with different children so that all our learners become comfortable working with all their peers, whatever their differences in background and prior achievement. During class discussions children are encouraged to listen to one another and acknowledge their differences in a spirit of acceptance and respect.

Every year we mark Anti-bullying Week with a range of events to raise awareness and encourage positive relationships between all children in the school. This is underpinned by a clear and consistently-enforced anti-bullying policy.

Each week we hold a celebration assembly to share our achievements. Through this children, parents and carers are encouraged to notice and praise one another’s strengths and achievements.

We follow the Gateshead SACRE’s agreed syllabus for RE which encourages understanding of the different major faiths and religions around the world. The RE and PSHE curriculum both promote a thorough exploration of how both religious and non-religious people approach questions of meaning, ethics and philosophy. Children at Fell Dyke Primary visit places of worship throughout their time at the school in order to gain first-hand experience of other religious beliefs.

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